Poland On The Last Day D+24 (2 August, 1987) Part II

D+24 continued on and the air of impending doom circulated around Poland. With the vast number of Soviet airbases, supply depots, headquarters and other military bases on Polish soil, an overwhelming majority of Poles expected their country to be next. News of additional nuclear explosions in the GDR and West Germany enhanced the panic. Shelters …

Poland On The Last Day D+24 (2 August, 1987)

It did not take long for word of Wunsdorf’s destruction to reach in Poland. Owing to time and circumstances, the first people to learn of the nuclear event were members of the Polish military stationed in and around Legnica. On the surface these Poles remained loyal to the Soviet Union and thus were trusted, albeit …

The Politics of Global War: The Eve of Disintegration Part II

Poland Civilian demonstrations resumed on the morning of 26 July, 1987 in greater numbers than the previous day. Thousands of people turned out in almost every major city in the country. The audacity of the crowds was on full display as well. Buildings that housed government offices were ransacked and in some cases set ablaze. …

The Politics of Global War: Poland Teeters D+14 Part I

D+14 0000-0900 The meeting between the Soviet ambassador and Poland’s head of state concluded three minutes after midnight. As soon as the pompous Soviet diplomat was gone, Wojciech Jaruzelski summoned his aides and the senior members of his government. Telephone calls were made, and orders given. The Soviet ambassador had made a fatal mistake in …

The Politics of Global War: Cause and Effect D+13 (22 July, 1987) Part II

Two full weeks of war had all but removed the veil of uniform civility and compliance from the face of the Polish populace. The relationship between the Poles, and their Soviet overseers was nearing the point of extreme duress. The war showed every sign of continuing and growing in size and scope. Every night NATO …

The Politics of Global War: The Polish Powder Keg

After eight days of war the Polish People’s Republic was beginning to show signs of uneasiness. Though the evidence was generally unnoticed by a world preoccupied by the war raging, it was nevertheless present, and smoldering. The direct effects of the war were being felt more by Poland than any other Warsaw Pact member-state, with …