D+18 0000-0400 Zulu 27 July, 1987 Part III

Moscow, USSR 0300 Zulu, 27 July, 1987 (0600 local time) The Defense Council reconvened in the Kremlin promptly at 6 AM. Marshal Akhromeyev and General Snetkov were the last men to enter the room. The newly minted CINC-West was aware of the eyes on him, particularly those of the General Secretary. Romanov studied the army …

The Politics of Global War: A Crucial Day in Moscow Part III

Author’s Note: Apologies for the lateness of this post and the quality. As most of you know, Ida’s remnants blew through NJ Wednesday night, leaving a trail of destruction behind. I’m safe and sound and so are my friends and family. But the last couple of days have been filled with clean up, helping out …

The Politics of Global War: In the Shadow of Escalation Part I

In the last forty-eight hours leading up to the start of hostilities in early July, 1987, officials from the United States and Soviet governments undertook a series of clandestine meetings in Zurich, Switzerland. These meetings were not eleventh-hour negotiations aimed at averting war. By this point it was a generally accepted fact in Washington, Moscow, …

The Politics of Global War: The Restive Kremlin D+11 (20 July, 1987) Part III

Present conditions in the Northwestern TVD (NWTVD) were far from ideal. Every man seated at the conference table was aware of troubles and issues in the north but not the extent of them. This included General Secretary Romanov. Marshal Akhromeyev understood this was his time to speak the unfettered truth. Failure to do so would …

The Politics of Global War: The Restive Kremlin D+11 (20 July, 1987) Part II

Marshal Akhromeyev started with Germany. He did not exaggerate or diverge from the truth, yet presented only as many details as were necessary to support the briefing. The Red Army was advancing-slower than expected but still moving west. The reasons for the slow progress were summarized swiftly with Akhromeyev careful not to dwell, or allow …

The Northern Flank D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part I

The discovery that the Geneva Pause was, in fact, an elaborate ruse conjured up by the Dutch and West German governments was received unfavorably by General Secretary Romanov, and the upper echelons of Soviet political, and military leadership. Romanov’s outrage stemmed from the realization that he had been played the fool. The indignation and frustration …

Awakening In Brussels **

In the days following Mikhail Gorbachev’s ouster, NATO’s civilian leadership, and military commanders collectively began to consider what the ramifications of the coup for their alliance, its member-nations, and for the military men, their respective commands. Romanov was a dyed-in-the-wool hardliner. It was generally assumed he would  turn his attention to the smoldering situation in …