The North Atlantic D+3 (12 July, 1987) Part II

The scene at the GIUK gap on D+3 is best described as one of confused chaos. Efforts against Russian attack subs heading into the Atlantic continued. The high kill claims by P-3 and Nimrod crews and surface ship commanders, had collided  with conflicting reports of enemy submarines approaching the Atlantic sea lanes to create a …

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The North Atlantic D+3 (12 July, 1987) Part I

At 0556 EDT an ASM-135 Anti-Satellite missile launched from a US Air Force F-15A Eagle destroyed a Soviet Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) in low-earth orbit over the Labrador coast. The successful intercept would create a twelve hour hole in Soviet satellite coverage over the North Atlantic. The mission had been timed, planned, and undertaken …

The North Atlantic D+2 (11 July, 1987) Part I

Defensive operations at the GIUK barrier were underway in earnest by dawn on 11 July. The tempo of operations increased through the morning, and afternoon, peaking at some point around 1600 Zulu. The first wave of Soviet SSNs and SSGNs heading south encountered an aggressive, well-coordinated, multi-layered defense made up of MPAs, surface ships, and …

The North Atlantic: 10 July, 1987 Part I

Through thirty-eight years of multinational naval exercises from the Barents Sea to the Bahamas,  naval conferences, and spending innumerable hours at sea, NATO naval officers had developed a staunch respect for the significance of the Atlantic Ocean to alliance plans. Senior officers especially recognized it as the linchpin of the alliance in a time of …