The North Atlantic D+20 (29 July, 1987) Part III

As the last aircraft trapped on Kitty Hawk, debriefings were already underway. Officers from Forrestal’s air wing, which was slated to handle the afternoon strikes, had flown over to Kitty Hawk and were present as CVW-9s aircrews recited the morning missions from their own perspectives. The Soviet tactics had come as a rude surprise. Forcing …

The North Atlantic D+20 (29 July, 1987) Part II

Author’s Note: Going to have split North Atlantic into 3 parts. Real world commitments have cut my blog writing time down this week,  so we won’t finish North Atlantic until Friday. Not a terrible setback,  but still. 😊 –Mike 0632- Sixty miles southeast of Bear Island, the USS Kitty Hawk turned into the wind and …

The North Atlantic D+15 (24 July, 1987) Part III

As the afternoon went on, Strike Fleet Atlantic remained on station in the northern Norwegian Sea. The three aircraft carriers and their attending battlegroups were still positioned in close proximity to one another, allowing a smoother and better-coordinated mutual defense. Given the new orders that were received earlier in the day, the strike fleet’s staff …

The North Atlantic D+15 (24 July, 1987) Part I

Political developments late in the evening of D+14 necessitated an abrupt halt to SACLANT’s planned operations for the following day. At 0100 on D+15, Admiral Lee Baggett Jr, USN took a phone call directly from President Reagan. The president summarized the hotline conversation he had recently completed with the Soviet general secretary. The situation at …

The North Atlantic D+14 (23 July, 1987) Part IV

CVW-7’s missions in the afternoon against Kola air defenses and radars brought about mixed results. The majority of SA-5 and SA-10 sites sustained damage from ARM hits. The damage inflicted on Soviet radar sites was more decisive. Though many SAM sites were effectively blinded for a temporary period of time, they were not permanently out …