The North Atlantic D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part II

As the cargo ships assigned to Convoy 27-1 continued to unload in LeHavre on the morning of D+6, SACLANT unceremoniously declared the convoy defunct. The destroyers and frigates that escorted the merchantmen across the Atlantic departed LeHavre before dawn and began their return journeys back to the east coast of the US. These ships would …

The North Atlantic D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part I

The Norwegian Sea was setting up like a chessboard. In place of the traditional white and black sides were the more contemporary red and blue representing the Soviet Union and NATO. The collection of US and allied warships steaming north was as impressive, and indomitable a collection of sea-going knights, bishops, and rooks as any …

Baltic Approaches D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part II

Pre-war Soviet and Warsaw Pact plans for the Coastal Front anticipated that amphibious and airborne operations against Denmark would not begin until total air superiority had been obtained. The land advance up through Schleswig-Holstein and onto the Jutland peninsula was expected to reap the benefits of complete Pact control of the skies by the time …

The Northern Flank D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part III

The Norwegian government’s opposition to a major NATO counter-air effort over the northern region of the country was unchanged through the morning hours. The 24 hour hold promised by Prime Minister Thatcher and US Secretary of State George Shultz was twelve hours old. Their efforts towards reaching a resolution were starting to make headway but …

The Northern Flank D+6 (15 July, 1987) Part I

The discovery that the Geneva Pause was, in fact, an elaborate ruse conjured up by the Dutch and West German governments was received unfavorably by General Secretary Romanov, and the upper echelons of Soviet political, and military leadership. Romanov’s outrage stemmed from the realization that he had been played the fool. The indignation and frustration …